Teaching Guide

One of the great things about the press my book is coming out of is that it is an educational press, so I have the opportunity to ask someone to write a teaching guide for my book. As a Creative Writing teacher I feel that this is very important, but now I have to find someone who will agree to do it! Ideally it would be someone who is both a great Creative Writing teacher and understands my border subject matter. 

We’ll see what I can come up with! More updates coming soon. 


Borges found me again today. I recommended him to a student who considers himself more of a physics guy than a writer and bam! I was had to re-read a bunch of his short stories. I haven’t felt this kind of urgency to write in so long. Time to get at it! 

…that is after I finish teaching, going to faculty meetings, and other such distractions from my art…ugh…

Borges found me again today. I recommended him to a student who considers himself more of a physics guy than a writer and bam! I was had to re-read a bunch of his short stories. I haven’t felt this kind of urgency to write in so long. Time to get at it! 

…that is after I finish teaching, going to faculty meetings, and other such distractions from my art…ugh…


Book Acceptance!

I recently found out that my poetry collection, THE VERGING CITIES, will be published as a part of the Mountain West Poetry Series published by The Center for Literary Publishing! I’m super excited and honored to have been chosen. 

The Mountain West Poetry Series has published other writers I admire like Carmen Gimenez Smith and Rebecca Lindenberg, so I’m honored to be in such company.This would never have been possible without my wonderful mentors Lisa D. Chavez, Dana Levin, and Luci Tapahonso, or without the help of my dear writer friends, Nick DePascal, Bonnie Arning, and Nora Hickey. Stay tuned for more details! 

I’m also going to try to update this thing more frequently. I feel like I need to make more of a connection between my writerly life and the outside world. 


Writers I’m Smitten With
It’s been awhile since I’ve posted anything about books I’m reading. But, Alfred Starr Hamilton’s A Dark Dreambox of Another Kind got me so excited I couldn’t resist! If you haven’t taken a look at this strange little book you absolutely should.
During my time working for Blue Mesa Review we would always discuss what made a poem more “of the academy” or “outside of the academy,” meaning which poems had obviously seen a workshop, and which poems we thought were working beautifully without that kind of sterile crafting. Hamilton’s work is that rare kind of poetry that chooses to go so against what would be taught in a workshop. It excites me! In places it seems loose, others too tight, most poems only develop the metaphorical landscape but don’t have a literal landscape, but in all cases the poems are beautiful and survive in my memory despite these things. I think these poems survive gravity—which interests me as a writer. We should all survive gravity a little more. Not sure what I mean there? It’s okay, I don’t totally know either. But Hamilton wouldn’t want me to explain myself, so I won’t. Here’s a quick excerpt:

"Little"
aren’t we all lifelike?
Those are the thuds of thunder
at the back of our bones
aren’t we all moonlike?
Those are the buds of thunder
by our glassified gravestones
aren’t we all ready
for those moonlike promises?
Aren’t we all being a little talkative as yet?
for those buds of thunder
at the back of our moonlike bones

Writers I’m Smitten With

It’s been awhile since I’ve posted anything about books I’m reading. But, Alfred Starr Hamilton’s A Dark Dreambox of Another Kind got me so excited I couldn’t resist! If you haven’t taken a look at this strange little book you absolutely should.

During my time working for Blue Mesa Review we would always discuss what made a poem more “of the academy” or “outside of the academy,” meaning which poems had obviously seen a workshop, and which poems we thought were working beautifully without that kind of sterile crafting. Hamilton’s work is that rare kind of poetry that chooses to go so against what would be taught in a workshop. It excites me! In places it seems loose, others too tight, most poems only develop the metaphorical landscape but don’t have a literal landscape, but in all cases the poems are beautiful and survive in my memory despite these things. I think these poems survive gravity—which interests me as a writer. We should all survive gravity a little more. Not sure what I mean there? It’s okay, I don’t totally know either. But Hamilton wouldn’t want me to explain myself, so I won’t. Here’s a quick excerpt:

"Little"

aren’t we all lifelike?

Those are the thuds of thunder

at the back of our bones

aren’t we all moonlike?

Those are the buds of thunder

by our glassified gravestones

aren’t we all ready

for those moonlike promises?

Aren’t we all being a little talkative as yet?

for those buds of thunder

at the back of our moonlike bones


thetinhouse:

What are you working on? 

thetinhouse:

What are you working on? 


But I like little poetry books too!

But I like little poetry books too!

(via natzap88)



IT’S A BEAUT 
Today Ninth Letter sent me this beautiful new issue (vol. 10 no. 1) in the mail. I’m very impressed with the quality of the design and the content of their work. I will be submitting to Ninth Letter again soon. My favorite poem of the issue by far is, “Laws of Stasis” by Matthew Gavin Frank. Here are the first few stanzas:
Here, tonight’s blue plate
special is cherry tree. It’s
 
still alive and producing 
yellow cherries. Cézanne
 
would have sold nothing
of axes, preferring
 
the narrative of bees, of blue
bowls, of still commodes
 
on which one’s wife is still
dying. You tell me between 
 
mouthfuls that Washington
is engorged. Un-Georged? I say. 

IT’S A BEAUT 

Today Ninth Letter sent me this beautiful new issue (vol. 10 no. 1) in the mail. I’m very impressed with the quality of the design and the content of their work. I will be submitting to Ninth Letter again soon. My favorite poem of the issue by far is, “Laws of Stasis” by Matthew Gavin Frank. Here are the first few stanzas:

Here, tonight’s blue plate

special is cherry tree. It’s

 

still alive and producing

yellow cherries. Cézanne

 

would have sold nothing

of axes, preferring

 

the narrative of bees, of blue

bowls, of still commodes

 

on which one’s wife is still

dying. You tell me between

 

mouthfuls that Washington

is engorged. Un-Georged? I say. 


WRITERS I AM SMITTEN WITH
I am currently smitten with Maram Al-Massri’s A Red Cherry on a White-Tiled Floor. So much so, that I am in bed at 3:30 in the afternoon reading her beautiful work.
Here is an excerpt:
12. A minute on my left
side,
a minute on my right
side,
a little on my back,
a while on my stomach,
I spin in emptiness.
Cold on my bed.
Cold in my dreams.
The thieves of sleep
have raided my night.
One of them
pitied me
and left me the morning
shining on the table.  

WRITERS I AM SMITTEN WITH

I am currently smitten with Maram Al-Massri’s A Red Cherry on a White-Tiled Floor. So much so, that I am in bed at 3:30 in the afternoon reading her beautiful work.

Here is an excerpt:

12. A minute on my left

side,

a minute on my right

side,

a little on my back,

a while on my stomach,

I spin in emptiness.

Cold on my bed.

Cold in my dreams.

The thieves of sleep

have raided my night.

One of them

pitied me

and left me the morning

shining on the table.